cardboard box travel shop logo

Cardboard Box Travel Shop

Namibia


Khaudum Park

a remote national park

Tucked away in the Kavango Region is the extremely wild and undeveloped Khaudum Game Park. It was established with conservation in mind, as opposed to financial revenue. It is rarely visited, probably because of it's basic tourist infrastructure, but nevertheless, those with an adventurous streak, should look no further than 'Namibia's forgotten wilderness.' There are more elephants that visitors and perhaps those who are used to the 'well-beaten paths and tracks' of bigger and more famous National Parks, could spend at least a few exhilarating days here.

Khaudum operates an open-park system, which goes some way to explaining why game numbers vary considerably. Only the border with Botswana and a 55km section of the western border of the park are fenced; this enables animals to follow their natural hereditary migration routes to and from the water-rich Kavango River and floodplains. The 384,000ha coverage is home to animals such as antelope, huge herds of elephant, zebras, African wild dog, lions, leopards as well as 320 bird species.

There are two tourist camps - with basic facilities - in the park, Sikeretti in the south and Khaudum Camp in the north. The nearest places for supplies are in Frontiersmen or Rundu and no fresh produce is available withing Khaudum or the surrounding villages. The water at both camps is suitable for drinking and it is advisable to drink plenty of it daily, as dehydration is common in these areas. benefit this age of conservation and tourism directly not only in conjunction with the support of rural communities, but with their involvement of the protection of wildlife. So therefore relaxing at one of the state-of-the-art hides is recommended, not just to enjoy the wildlife that congregates around the waterholes, but to listen to the sounds of the wild and the voices of the local people. Their stories of demon elephants, spirits, rescues, ordeals, struggles and strange events, will outdo anything you'll here from other explorers in Joe's Beerhouse in Windhoek at the end of your safari.

Khaudum National Park is all about adventure, and half the fun of any journey is getting there. But the roads can be poor, and the best time to visit is during the dry winter months, June to October. A minimum of two 4x4 wheel drive vehicles must be used per party, provisions for 3 days and 100 litres of water per vehicle, per day, must be taken. It also goes without saying that as travel is slow and heavy on fuel, your 4x4 must be constantly engaged. This has a lot to do with driving on tracks that tend to follow omurambas (dry river beds) that link several waterholes together. There are 12 artificial waterholes and 2 natural fountains and they can all be reached by vehicle as 2 track roads interlink the park in its entirety. Most of the watering holes have hides, from which game can be viewed safely.

There are 2 access points to the park. From the north it's from the Katere road and from the south entrance is via the Tsumkwe road. Drivers should note that all roads, including access roads, require 4x4 vehicles, mainly due to heavy, loose sand. There is no fuel available in the park and the closest fuel stations are at Tsumkwe (which only provides diesel and petrol 93 leaded type), Grootfontein (360km from Sikeretti Camp), Rundu (170km from Khaudum Camp) and Bagani/Divundu (150km from Khaudum Camp.) Some 37km from Khaudum Camp is a state clinic on the Katere – Khaudum camp road and the medical infrastructure at Tsumkwe is limited to a nurse.

  • Khaudum Park: Elephant Portait
  • Khaudum Park: Zebra After Rain
View more pictures:
Now Loading
Nhoma Camp

A partially community owned camp - allows guest to gain an insight into the lives of the local Bushman community

Tsumkwe Lodge

In the town of Tsumkwe this lodge offers an opportunity to visit the local San communities

Accommodation in Swakopmund

Accommodation in Namibia